Effectiveness of a low-intensity smoking cessation intervention for hospitalized patients.

TitleEffectiveness of a low-intensity smoking cessation intervention for hospitalized patients.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2006
AuthorsBize, R, Stoianov, R, Ruffieux, C, Ghali, W, Paccaud, F, Cornuz, J
JournalEur J Cancer Prev
Volume15
Issue5
Pagination464-70
Date Published2006 Oct
ISSN0959-8278
KeywordsAdolescent, Adult, Aged, Cohort Studies, Female, Hospitalization, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Odds Ratio, Reproducibility of Results, Smoking Cessation, Treatment Outcome
Abstract

Debate exists about how intense smoking cessation interventions for hospitalized patients should be. In this study we assessed the effectiveness of a low-intensity smoking cessation intervention for hospitalized patients, without follow-up phone calls. We designed a cohort study with a historical control group, in the Department of Medicine of an 850-bed teaching hospital. One hundred and seventeen consecutive eligible smokers received the intervention, and 113 smokers hospitalized before the implementation of the intervention constituted the historical control group. The 30-min smoking cessation intervention was performed by a trained resident without any follow-up contact. Counseling was matched to smokers' motivation to quit, and accompanied by a self-help booklet. Nicotine replacement therapy was prescribed when indicated. All patients received a questionnaire to evaluate their smoking habits 6 months after they left hospital. We counted patients lost to follow-up as continuous smokers and smoking abstinence was validated by patients' physicians. Validated smoking cessation rates were 23.9% in the intervention group and 9.7% in the control group (odds ratio 2.9, 95% confidence interval: 1.4-6.2). After adjusting for potential confounders, intervention was still effective with an adjusted odds ratio of 2.26 (95% confidence interval: 1.04-4.95). Among those who continued to smoke 6 months after hospitalization, the likelihood of reporting any decrease of cigarette consumption was higher in the intervention cohort (70.8 vs. 42.7%, P=0.001). A low-intensity smoking cessation intervention, based on two visits without any follow-up contact, is associated with a higher quit rate at 6 months than that for historical control patients. Our findings show that a low-intensity smoking cessation intervention, based on two visits without any follow-up contact, is associated with a higher quit rate at 6 months than that for historical control patients.

Alternate URL

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16912577?dopt=Abstract

Alternate JournalEur. J. Cancer Prev.
Citation Key / SERVAL ID2436
PubMed ID16912577

                         

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