Socio-demographic and behavioural determinants of weight gain in the Swiss population.

TitleSocio-demographic and behavioural determinants of weight gain in the Swiss population.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2015
AuthorsGuerra, F, Stringhini, S, Vollenweider, P, Waeber, G, Marques-Vidal, P
JournalBmc Public Health
Volume15
Issue1
Pagination73
Date Published01/2015
URLhttp://my.unil.ch/serval/document/BIB_A73D989E9016.pdf
DOI10.1186/s12889-015-1451-9
ISSN1471-2458
Abstract

Background: In Switzerland, socio-demographic and behavioural factors are associated with obesity, but no study ever assessed their impact on weight gain using prospective data.

Methods: Data from 4,469 participants (53.0% women), aged 35 to 75 years at baseline and followed for 5.5 years. Weight gain was considered as a rate (kg/year) or as gaining ¿5 kg during the study period.

Results: Rate of weight gain was lower among participants who were older (mean¿±¿standard deviation: 0.46¿±¿0.92, 0.33¿±¿0.88, 0.21¿±¿0.86 and 0.06¿±¿0.74 kg/year in participants aged [35-45[, [45-55[, [55¿65[and [65+ years, respectively, P<0.001); physically active (0.27¿±¿0.82 vs. 0.35¿±¿0.95 kg/year for sedentary, P¿<¿0.005) or living in a couple (0.29¿±¿0.84 vs. 0.35¿±¿0.96 kg/year for living single, P¿<¿0.05), and higher among current smokers (0.41¿±¿0.97, 0.26¿±¿0.84 and 0.29±0.85 kg/year for current, former and never smokers, respectively, p<0.001). These findings were further confirmed by multivariable analysis. Multivariable logistic regression showed that receiving social help, being a current smoker or obese increased the likelihood of gaining ¿5Kg: Odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.43 (1.16-1.77); 1.63 (1.35-1.95) and 1.95 (1.57-2.43), respectively, while living in couple or being physically active decreased the risk: 0.73 (0.62-0.86) and 0.72 (0.62-0.83), respectively. No association was found between weight gain and gender, being born in Switzerland or education.

Conclusions: In Switzerland, financial difficulties (indicated by receiving social help) and current smoking were associated with increases in body weight over a 5 years follow-up. Living in couple, being older or physically active were protective against weight gain.

Alternate URL

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25636964?dopt=Abstract

WOS ID (UT)

000349418800038

Alternate JournalBMC Public Health
Citation Key / SERVAL IDserval:BIB_A73D989E9016
Peer reviewRefereed
PubMed ID25636964
PubMed Central IDPMC4320497
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