Short-term effects of particulate matters on pulse pressure in two general population studies.

TitleShort-term effects of particulate matters on pulse pressure in two general population studies.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2015
AuthorsTsai, D-H, Guessous, I, Riediker, M, Paccaud, F, Gaspoz, J-M, Theler, J-M, Waeber, G, Vollenweider, P, Bochud, M
JournalJournal of Hypertension
Volume33
Issue6
Pagination1144-1152
Date Published06/2015
DOI10.1097/HJH.0000000000000533
ISSN1473-5598
ISBN Number1473-5598 (Electronic)
KeywordsAdult, Aged, Air Pollutants, Blood Pressure, Cardiovascular Diseases, Female, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Models, Theoretical, Particulate Matter, Risk Factors, Switzerland, Temperature, Time Factors
Abstract

OBJECTIVES: To explore the association of short-term exposure to particulate matter with aerodynamic diameters less than 10 μm (PM10) with pulse pressure, SBP, and DBP taking outdoor temperature into account in two large population-based studies in Switzerland.

METHODS: We used data from the Bus Santé study including 5605 adults in Geneva and the CoLaus study including 6183 adults in Lausanne. PM10 and meteorological data were measured from fixed monitoring stations. We analyzed the association of short-term exposure to PM10 (on the day of examination visit and up to 7 days before) with pulse pressure, SBP, and DBP by linear regression, controlling for potential confounders and effect modifiers.

RESULTS: Average PM10 levels were 22.4 μg/m in Geneva and 31.7 μg/m in Lausanne. In adjusted models, for each 10 μg/m increase in 7-day PM10 average, pulse pressure and SBP increased by 0.583 (95% confidence interval, 0.296-0.870) mmHg and 0.490 (0.056-0.925) mmHg in Geneva, and 0.183 (0.017-0.348) mmHg and 0.036 (0.042-0.561) mmHg in Lausanne, respectively. Stronger associations of pulse pressure and SBP with PM10 were observed when outdoor temperature was above 5°C.

CONCLUSION: Positive associations of pulse pressure and SBP with short-term exposure to PM10 were found and replicated in the Swiss adult population. Our results suggest that even low levels of air pollution may substantially impact cardiovascular risk in the general population.

Notes

IUMSP2015/06

Alternate URL

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25668352?dopt=Abstract

WOS ID (UT)

000353819700007

Alternate JournalJ. Hypertens.
Citation Key / SERVAL ID5659
Peer reviewRefereed
PubMed ID25668352
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