New anthropometry-based age- and sex-specific reference values for urinary 24-hour creatinine excretion based on the adult Swiss population (epublish)

TitleNew anthropometry-based age- and sex-specific reference values for urinary 24-hour creatinine excretion based on the adult Swiss population (epublish)
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2015
AuthorsV. Ogna, F, Ogna, A, Vuistiner, P, Pruijm, M, Ponte, B, Ackermann, D, Gabutti, L, Vakilzadeh, N, Mohaupt, M, Martin, PY, Guessous, I, Péchère-Bertschi, A, Paccaud, F, Bochud, M, Burnier, M, Swiss Salt Survey Group
JournalBmc Medicine
Volume13
Pagination40
Date Published02/2015
URLhttp://my.unil.ch/serval/document/BIB_6C1E4D18FFDF.pdf
DOI10.1186/s12916-015-0275-x
ISSN1741-7015
Abstract

BACKGROUND: Urinary creatinine excretion is used as a marker of completeness of timed urine collections, which are a keystone of several metabolic evaluations in clinical investigations and epidemiological surveys.

METHODS: We used data from two independent Swiss cross-sectional population-based studies with standardised 24-hour urinary collection and measured anthropometric variables. Only data from adults of European descent, with estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) ≥60 ml/min/1.73 m2 and reported completeness of the urinary collection were retained. A linear regression model was developed to predict centiles of the 24-hour urinary creatinine excretion in 1,137 participants from the Swiss Survey on Salt and validated in 994 participants from the Swiss Kidney Project on Genes in Hypertension.

RESULTS: The mean urinary creatinine excretion was 193 ± 41 μmol/kg/24 hours in men and 151 ± 38 μmol/kg/24 hours in women in the Swiss Survey on Salt. The values were inversely correlated with age and body mass index (BMI).

CONCLUSIONS: We propose a validated prediction equation for 24-hour urinary creatinine excretion in the general European population, based on readily available variables such as age, sex and BMI, and a few derived normograms to ease its clinical application. This should help healthcare providers to interpret the completeness of a 24-hour urine collection in daily clinical practice and in epidemiological population studies.

Notes

Publication Status: epublish

Alternate URL

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25858764?dopt=Abstract

WOS ID (UT)

000350718700001

Alternate JournalBMC Med
Citation Key / SERVAL IDserval:BIB_6C1E4D18FFDF
Peer reviewRefereed
PubMed ID25858764
PubMed Central IDPMC4354997

                         

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