The Evolution of Health Care Utilisation and Costs for Inflammatory Bowel Disease Over Ten Years.

TitleThe Evolution of Health Care Utilisation and Costs for Inflammatory Bowel Disease Over Ten Years.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2019
AuthorsPillai, N, Dusheiko, M, Maillard, MH, Rogler, G, Brüngger, B, Bähler, C, Pittet, V
Corporate AuthorsSwiss IBD Cohort Study Group
JournalJournal of Crohn's & colitis
Volume13
Issue6
Pagination744-754
Date Published05/2019
DOI10.1093/ecco-jcc/jjz003
ISSN1876-4479
KeywordsCrohn’s disease, health economics, IBD, ulcerative colitis
Abstract

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Inflammatory bowel disease [IBD] places an economic strain on health systems due to expensive pharmaceutical therapy, risk of hospitalisation and surgery, and long-term monitoring. The evolving treatment guidelines advocate rapid scale-up to biologic agents in order to improve health outcomes and quality of life. This study evaluated changes in health care utilisation and expenditures for IBD in Switzerland over time.

METHODS: We extracted clinical, patient, and resource consumption data from the Swiss IBD Cohort Study between 2006 and 2016. Average unit costs for IBD-related events were derived from Swiss claims data and pharmaceutical price lists. We used multivariate regression, controlling for patient-level characteristics, to estimate trends and determinants of direct and indirect costs and resource utilisation.

RESULTS: We included 2365 adults diagnosed with Crohn's disease [CD; N = 1353] and ulcerative colitis [UC; N = 1012]. From 2006-16, mean health care expenditures per patient per year were 9504 euros [70% drugs, 23% inpatient, 7% outpatient] for CD and 5704 euros [68% drugs, 22% inpatient, 10% outpatient] for UC. Health care costs increased by 7% [CD] and 10% [UC] per year, largely due to rising pharmaceutical expenditures driven by increased biologic agent use. Inpatient, outpatient, and indirect costs fluctuated and did not offset increased pharmaceutical costs. Disease characteristics were important predictors of costs.

CONCLUSIONS: Increased expenditure for IBD was marked by a shift towards greater pharmaceutical management over the past decade. This study highlights the need to identify cost-effective treatment strategies in the face of increased uptake and expenditures associated with innovative treatments.

Alternate URL

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30916775?dopt=Abstract

WOS ID (UT)

000469781200008

Alternate JournalJ Crohns Colitis
Citation Key / SERVAL ID9562
Peer reviewRefereed
PubMed ID30916775

                         

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