Trends in the association between height and socioeconomic indicators in France, 1970-2003.

TitreTrends in the association between height and socioeconomic indicators in France, 1970-2003.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2010
AuthorsSingh-Manoux, A, Gourmelen, J, Ferrie, J, Silventoinen, K, Guéguen, A, Stringhini, S, Nabi, H, Kivimaki, M
JournalEcon Hum Biol
Volume8
Issue3
Pagination396-404
Date Published2010 Dec
DOI10.1016/j.ehb.2010.03.002
ISSN1873-6130
Mots-clésAdult, Body Height, Confidence Intervals, Cross-Sectional Studies, Data Collection, Educational Status, Female, France, Health Status Disparities, Humans, Income, Male, Middle Aged, Poverty, Questionnaires, Reference Values, Social Class, Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract

Average physical stature has increased dramatically during the 20th century in many populations across the world with few exceptions. It remains unclear if social inequalities in height persist despite improvements in living standards in the welfare economies of Western Europe. We examined trends in the association between height and socioeconomic indicators in adults over three decades in France. The data were drawn from the French Decennial Health Surveys: a multistage, stratified, random survey of households, representative of the population, conducted in 1970, 1980, 1991, and 2003. We categorised age into 10-year bands, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54 and 55-64 years. Education and income were the two socioeconomic measures used. The slope index of inequality (SII) was used as a summary index of absolute social inequalities in height. The results show that average height increased over this period; men and women aged 25-34 years were 171.9 and 161.2 cm tall in 1970 and 177.0 and 164.0 cm in 2003, respectively. However, education-related inequalities in height remained unchanged over this period and in men were 4.48 cm (1970), 4.71 cm (1980), 5.58 cm (1991) and 4.69 cm (2003), the corresponding figures in women were 2.41, 2.37, 3.14 and 2.96 cm. Income-related inequalities in height were smaller and much attenuated after adjustment for education. These results suggest that in France, social inequalities in adult height in absolute terms have remained unchanged across the three decades under examination.

Alternate URL

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20400383?dopt=Abstract

Alternate JournalEcon Hum Biol
Citation Key / SERVAL ID2887
PubMed ID20400383
PubMed Central IDPMC2914812
Grant ListR01 AG013196 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States
R01 AG013196-14 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States
R01 AG034454 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States
R01 AG034454-01 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States
R01AG013196 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States
R01AG034454 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States
R01HL036310 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States

                         

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