Prevalence of anaemia in inflammatory bowel disease in Switzerland: a cross-sectional study in patients from private practices and university hospitals.

TitrePrevalence of anaemia in inflammatory bowel disease in Switzerland: a cross-sectional study in patients from private practices and university hospitals.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2010
AuthorsVoegtlin, M, Vavricka, SR, Schoepfer, AM, Straumann, A, Voegtlin, J, Rogler, G, Ballabeni, P, Pittet, V, Buser, A, Fried, M, Beglinger, C
Corporate AuthorsStudy, SIBDCohort
JournalJ Crohns Colitis
Volume4
Issue6
Pagination642-8
Date Published2010 Dec
DOI10.1016/j.crohns.2010.07.008
ISSN1876-4479
Mots-clésAdult, Anemia, Anemia, Iron-Deficiency, Colitis, Ulcerative, Crohn Disease, Cross-Sectional Studies, Dietary Supplements, Erythrocyte Indices, Female, Ferritins, Folic Acid, Hospitals, University, Humans, Inflammatory Bowel Diseases, Iron, Male, Middle Aged, Prevalence, Private Practice, Prospective Studies, Severity of Illness Index, Sex Distribution, Switzerland, Vitamin B 12
Abstract

BACKGROUND: Anaemia represents a common complication of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Most studies on anaemia in IBD patients have been performed in tertiary referral centres (RC) and data from gastroenterologic practices (GP) are lacking. We investigated the frequency and severity of anaemia in IBD patients from tertiary referral centres and gastroenterologic practices compared to the general population.

METHODS: Data were acquired from patients included in the Swiss IBD Cohort Study. IBD activity was evaluated by CDAI and modified Truelove and Witts severity index (MTWSI). Anaemia was defined as haemoglobin ≤120g/L in women and ≤130g/L in men.

RESULTS: 125 patients from RC (66 with Crohn's disease (CD) and 59 with ulcerative colitis (UC)) and 116 patients from GP (71 CD and 45 UC) were included and compared to 6074 blood donors. Anaemia was found in 21.2% (51/241) of the IBD patients and more frequently in patients from RC as compared to GP and healthy controls (28.8% vs. 12.9% vs. 3.4%; P

CONCLUSIONS: Anaemia is a common complication in patients with IBD and significantly more prevalent in patients from referral centres as compared to patients from gastroenterologic practices. Physicians treating IBD patients should pay attention to the presence of anaemia and ensure sufficient supplementation therapy.

Alternate URL

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21122574?dopt=Abstract

Alternate JournalJ Crohns Colitis
Citation Key / SERVAL ID2981
PubMed ID21122574

                         

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