Are young men who overestimate drinking by others more likely to respond to an electronic normative feedback brief intervention for unhealthy alcohol use?

TitreAre young men who overestimate drinking by others more likely to respond to an electronic normative feedback brief intervention for unhealthy alcohol use?
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2016
AuthorsBertholet, N, Daeppen, J-B, Cunningham, JA, Burnand, B, Gmel, G, Gaume, J
JournalAddictive behaviors
Volume63
Pagination97-101
Date Published2016 Dec
DOI10.1016/j.addbeh.2016.07.015
ISSN1873-6327
Mots-clésAdult, Alcohol, Alcohol Drinking/psychology, Alcoholism/psychology, Alcoholism/therapy, Attitude to Health, Brief intervention, Brief/methods, Feedback, Humans, Internet, Male, Normative feedback, Psychological, Psychotherapy, Self Report, Switzerland, Treatment Outcome, Young Adult, Young men
Abstract

AIM: To tested whether the efficacy of an internet-based brief intervention that included normative drinking feedback varied with estimations of the drinking of others.

METHODS: This study is a secondary analysis of a randomized controlled trial showing an intervention effect on weekly drinking. Participants were males with unhealthy alcohol use (mean age [SD]=20.8 [1.1]). Before the trial, participants were asked to estimate the percentage of men their age who drink more than they do. Using their self-reported drinking data, the "perceived" percentage of people their age and gender who drink more than they do, and data from Swiss statistics, we classified participants as overestimating (>+10%), accurately (-10% to +10%) or underestimating (<-10%) drinking by others.

RESULTS: Of 734 participants with complete data, 427 overestimated, 205 accurately estimated and 102 underestimated the drinking of others. The mean (SD) number of drinks per week was 9.8 (7.9) and AUDIT score was 10.6 (4.2). In stratified negative binomial regression models predicting drinks per week, at 6months, and controlling for baseline drinks per week, the intervention was effective among those overestimating (IRR[95%CI]=0.86[0.74;0.98]), but showed no effect among those accurately estimating (IRR[95%CI]=0.83[0.66;1.03]) or underestimating IRR[95%CI]=1.21[0.92;1.60]) the drinking of others.

CONCLUSIONS: Perception of drinking by others appears to be a moderator of effect of an electronic feedback intervention among hazardous drinkers. This finding is consistent with the hypothesis that correcting the perceptions of others' drinking is a potential mechanism of action in normative feedback paradigms.

Alternate URL

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27450907?dopt=Abstract

WOS ID (UT)

000382798200016

Alternate JournalAddict Behav
Citation Key / SERVAL ID7166
Peer reviewRefereed
PubMed ID27450907

                         

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