Clinical significance of periodic limb movements during sleep: the HypnoLaus study

TitreClinical significance of periodic limb movements during sleep: the HypnoLaus study
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2018
AuthorsHaba-Rubio, J, Marti-Soler, H, Tobback, N, Andries, D, Marques-Vidal, P, Vollenweider, P, Preisig, M, Heinzer, R
JournalSleep Medicine
Volume41
Pagination45 - 50
Date Published01/2018
DOI10.1016/j.sleep.2017.09.014
ISSN1389-9457
Accession NumberPMID:29425577
Mots-clésCardiovascular risk factors, General Medicine, Polysomnography, Sleep, Sleepiness
Abstract

Periodic limb movements during sleep (PLMS) are prevalent in the general population, but their impact on sleep and association with cardiometabolic disorders are a matter of debate.
Data from 2162 participants (51.2% women, mean age 58.4 ± 11.1 years) of the population-based HypnoLaus study (Lausanne, Switzerland) were collected. Subjective sleep complaints and habits were assessed using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index and the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS). Participants underwent a full polysomnography (PSG) at home and were evaluated for the presence of hypertension, diabetes, and metabolic syndrome.
Participants with a PLMS index (PLMSI) > 15/h (28.6% of the sample) had longer subjective sleep latency (18.6 ± 17.2 vs. 16.1 ± 14.3 min, p = 0.014) and duration (7.1 ± 1.2 vs. 6.9 ± 1.1 h, p < 0.001) than participants with PLMSI ≤ 15/h. At the PSG, they spent more time in stage N2 sleep (49.0 ± 11.2 vs. 45.5 ± 9.8%, p < 0.001), less in stage N3 (17.6 ± 8.2 vs. 20.6 ± 8.4%, p < 0.001) and in REM sleep (20.3 ± 6.4 vs. 22.4 ± 6.0%, p < 0.001), and exhibited longer REM latency (104.2 ± 70.2 vs. 91.7 ± 58.6 min, p < 0.001) and higher arousal index (26.5 ± 12.3 vs. 19.2 ± 9.7 n/h, p < 0.001). Participants with a PLMSI > 15/h had a lower ESS scores and higher prevalence of hypertension, diabetes, and metabolic syndrome. Multivariate analysis adjusting for confounding factors confirmed the independent association of PLMSI > 15/h with subjective sleep latency and duration, and with objective sleep structure disturbances. However, the associations with sleepiness and cardiovascular risk factors disappeared.
In our large middle-age European population-based sample, PLMSI > 15/h was associated with subjective and objective sleep disturbances but not with sleepiness, hypertension, diabetes, or metabolic syndrome.

WOS ID (UT)

000425268700007

Short TitleSleep Medicine
Citation Key / SERVAL ID8509
Peer reviewRefereed
                         

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