Development of a Discrete-Choice Experiment (DCE) to Elicit Adolescent and Parent Preferences for Hypodontia Treatment.

TitreDevelopment of a Discrete-Choice Experiment (DCE) to Elicit Adolescent and Parent Preferences for Hypodontia Treatment.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2019
AuthorsBarber, S, Bekker, H, Marti, J, Pavitt, S, Khambay, B, Meads, D
JournalThe patient
Volume12
Issue1
Pagination137-148
Date Published02/2019
DOI10.1007/s40271-018-0338-0
ISSN1178-1661
Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Our objective was to develop and test a discrete-choice experiment (DCE) survey to elicit adolescent and parent preferences for dental care for hypodontia (a developmental condition where one or more teeth fail to develop).

METHODS: This was a mixed-methods study. Participants were adolescents (aged 12-16 years) with hypodontia and their parents and the dentists providing hypodontia care. Stage one entailed attribute development, as follows. (1) Attribute identification: systematic review of hypodontia literature; interviews with adolescents with hypodontia (n = 8) and parents (n = 8); observation of hypodontia clinical consultations (n = 5); environmental scan of hypodontia patient information resources (n = 30); and systematic analysis of social media posts (n = 176). (2) Attribute selection: stakeholder consultation to develop items for a questionnaire; rating and ranking questionnaire for adolescents with hypodontia and parents (n = 18); further stakeholder consultation. Stage two involved the development of the DCE survey, and stage three included the pre-testing using cognitive interviews with adolescents (n = 12) and parents (n = 8) to assess face and content validity.

RESULTS: The attribute long list included 27 attributes focusing on service delivery and treatment outcome, from which seven 'important' attributes were selected for pre-testing. Cognitive interviewing suggested adolescents found the DCE choice tasks challenging to understand; the survey was modified to enhance its acceptability. One attribute was excluded as it showed poor validity with adolescents. Pre-testing suggested DCE choice tasks encouraged thinking and discussion about preferences for treatment.

CONCLUSIONS: Including the target respondent group in all stages of DCE development ensured the final DCE survey was valid and acceptable. DCE methods appear to be a useful tool for exploring joint decision making alongside conventional preference elicitation.

Alternate URL

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30367434?dopt=Abstract

First publication date (online)

10/2018

WOS ID (UT)

000455953700009

Alternate JournalPatient
Citation Key / SERVAL ID9161
Peer reviewRefereed
PubMed ID30367434
Grant ListDRF-2015-08-052 / / National Institute for Health Research /
Groupe spécialisé: 
                         

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