Complementary Medicine Use and Self-perceived Discrimination Among Asylum Seekers in Switzerland: A Cross-sectional Study.

TitreComplementary Medicine Use and Self-perceived Discrimination Among Asylum Seekers in Switzerland: A Cross-sectional Study.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2019
AuthorsWalthert, L, Bodenmann, P, Burnand, B, Rodondi, P-Y
JournalJournal of immigrant and minority health
Date Published05/2019
DOI10.1007/s10903-019-00895-5
ISSN1557-1920
Mots-clésAsylum seekers, Complementary and alternative medicine, Discrimination, Switzerland
Abstract

Scarce data exist on the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) by asylum seekers in Switzerland and their perception of discrimination. A cross-sectional study assessed the prevalence and type of CAM used by asylum seekers in one region of Switzerland and evaluated their self-perceived discrimination. Among the 61 asylum seekers who participated, lifetime prevalence of CAM use was 46%, with 28% reporting its use during the last year. Herbal medicine was the most frequently used CAM. Self-perceived discrimination was reported by 36% of asylum seekers, mainly related to their national origins. CAM users had a tendency to report more discrimination than non-users (44% vs. 30%). CAM use is prevalent among asylum seekers. Considering the importance of herbal medicine use and that only half of the respondents disclosed CAM use to their physician, clinicians should ask about it, notably because of potential risks of herb-drug interaction.

Alternate URL

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31079290?dopt=Abstract

Alternate JournalJ Immigr Minor Health
Citation Key / SERVAL ID9568
Peer reviewRefereed
PubMed ID31079290

                         

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