Suicide mortality follow-up of the Swiss National Cohort (1990-2014): sex-specific risk estimates by occupational socio-economic group in working-age population.

TitreSuicide mortality follow-up of the Swiss National Cohort (1990-2014): sex-specific risk estimates by occupational socio-economic group in working-age population.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2019
AuthorsCanu, IGuseva, Bovio, N, Mediouni, Z, Bochud, M, Wild, P
Corporate AuthorsSwiss National Cohort (SNC)
JournalSocial psychiatry and psychiatric epidemiology
Date Published05/2019
DOI10.1007/s00127-019-01728-4
ISSN1433-9285
Mots-clésGender differences, Job-skill level, Longitudinal study, Managers, Psychosocial conditions, Social inequality
Abstract

PURPOSE: To identify occupations and socio-economic groups with detrimental or protective effect on suicide mortality.

METHODS: For every occupation and economic activity/industry, we computed directly age-standardized mortality rates (DSRs) using the age structure of the European population (2010) and standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) for suicide using national cause-specific mortality rates. We further stratified analyses by socio-economic variables, job-skill level, and by three calendar periods (1990-1998/1999-2006/2007-2014).

RESULTS: The study sample comprised 5,834,618 participants (94,918,456 person-years). The highest DSRs were observed among unemployed/job-seeking group, in agricultural, fishery and related male workers, and in health and social activities female workers. The lowest DSRs were observed in real estate and renting, research and development, IT and other business activities in men and in agriculture, hunting and forestry industry in women. A consistent reduction in DSRs across three calendar periods was observed in men. In female corporate managers, DSRs increased over the 2007-2014 period compared with 1999-2006. Compared to general working-age population, unemployed/job-seeking people, manufacturing labourers, personal care and related workers, and motor vehicle drivers of both sexes were identified at risk of suicide. Moreover, an excess of suicide was observed among male material recording and transport clerks; nursing and midwife-associated professionals; and agricultural workers as well as among female writers and performing artists.

CONCLUSIONS: The findings suggest the detrimental effect of low socioeconomic positions, including unemployment, with respect to suicide mortality and a relationship between suicide and poor psychosocial working conditions in elementary occupations. Sex-specific results need further investigation.

Alternate URL

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31127347?dopt=Abstract

Alternate JournalSoc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol
Citation Key / SERVAL ID9595
Peer reviewRefereed
PubMed ID31127347
Grant List3347CO-108806 / / Schweizerischer Nationalfonds zur Förderung der Wissenschaftlichen Forschung /
33CS30_134273 / / Schweizerischer Nationalfonds zur Förderung der Wissenschaftlichen Forschung /
33CS30_148415 / / Schweizerischer Nationalfonds zur Förderung der Wissenschaftlichen Forschung /

                         

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